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UPDATE: Recycling collection in Golden Plains Shire, read more here www.goldenplains.vic.gov.au/news/recycling-collection-golden-plains-shire  

Cats

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Cat

Council has received a number of nuisance complaints regarding domestic cat activity within the Golden Plains Shire.

A key objective of Council’s Domestic Animal Management Plan seeks to ‘provide the community with a clear understanding of Council’s expectation of pet owners’. Our team is committed to reducing documented cat nuisance complaints. 

Across the Shire the majority of cat nuisance complaints relate to feral cat populations and in response Council has made cat traps available for residents with ongoing concerns. Within a residential street a cat can create a nuisance in a number of ways including cats fighting, scratching furniture, attacking or disrupting other pets, or killing native wildlife.

Several solutions are available to residents to address the ongoing problems associated with cats dependent on the level of ownership and problems presented.

Registered Cats

Complaints with townships received by Council often relate to the activities of registered cats, which if encountered by our Community Protection Officers will not be impounded unless the owner cannot be contacted or located. We are therefore relying on cat owners to assist Council by keeping cats indoors at night where possible. Furthermore, if you suspect that your cat is causing a nuisance on a neighbouring property you are encouraged to explore options for containing the cat within its yard.

Community Cats

Do you have a friendly and sociable cat that comes around often for a feed and to socialise? The chances are that you may be feeding a community cat, one that is owned by no one but well socialised around people and fed by numerous community members. The problem with community cats is that with no one taking responsibility for them they are never de-sexed, vaccinated, properly cared for or registered. These unowned cats often suffer from very poor health and live in a state of starvation and disease.

If you believe that you may be one of the hundreds of people out there feeding a community cat because you care for its welfare it may be time to take some action. Firstly, you will need to establish if the cat really is owned by anyone. You could do this by asking around the neighbourhood or by catching the cat and taking it somewhere to get it scanned for a microchip. Alternatively you could ring Council and enquire about a cat trap. When the cat is caught Council officers will collect the animal and scan to see if it has been microchipped.

Once it has been established that the cat is not owned by anyone then you will have the choice to care for the cat properly by having it registered, vaccinated and desexed or by sending it to the pound with the chance of it being rehomed.

Feral Cats

Feral cats are a significant problem within the Golden Plains Shire. In Victoria it’s believed there are 500,000 unowned stray and feral cats. Feral cats are known to kill native wildlife and are a nuisance in the community. Each year approximately 50,000 cats are impounded (only 10% of the estimated feral population), with the large majority of these euthanased. Council has made cat traps available for residents who have encountered a feral cat problem.

For more information about your responsibilities as a pet owner or the availability of cat traps please contact our Community Protection Team on 5220 7111. To learn more about being a responsible cat owner, visit the Department of Agriculture website.

Animals in Golden Plains

 

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Page Last Updated:

Monday, 10 December 2018 - 1:22pm

 

Council acknowledges the traditional Wadawurrung owners of this land. Council pays its respects to Wadawurrung Elders both past and present and extends that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People who are part of Golden Plains Shire.